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Parapan Archery

Archery - Parapan Am

Archery - Parapan Am


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Sport Overview

Archery for persons with a disability began as a means of rehabilitation as well as a leisure activity. In 1960, archery was introduced to the world as a Paralympic sport during the Games in Rome. Since then, archery has always been part of the Paralympic Games program.

The sport is fully integrated by the International and National Federations, and competitions will often involve both athletes with a disability and able-bodied athletes. All para-athletes are classified into categories based on the degree of their disability.

Canadian archers to watch include Kevin Evans, a two-time world champion and gold medallist at the Guadalajara 2011 Parapan Am Games as well as Alec Denys, who recently changed to the compound bow and is improving quickly. On the women’s side, Karen Van Nest, who is beginning her international career, will also be a contender in 2015.


History

The first competition was held in 1948 at England’s Stoke Mandeville hospital.


How it works

The sport is open to athletes with a physical disability such as spinal cord injury or amputee. A test of accuracy, strength and concentration, the recurve archer shoots at a target 122cm in diameter 70m away from the shooting line, while the compound archer shoots at a target of 80cm in diameter 50m away from the shooting line. Both bows are used during the para-archery event. Athletes may shoot from a standing position or a wheelchair.

Para-archery is fully integrated by the International and National Federations, and competitions will often involve both athletes with a disability and able-bodied athletes.


Terminology

Armguard
A piece of equipment placed on the athlete’s arm to protect it from being slapped by the bow string on release.

Arrow nock
The notch at the end of the arrow that fits around the bow string to hold the arrow in place.

Draw
The act of pulling the bow string back in preparation for shooting.

Nock
The notch at the end of the arrow that rests against the bow string.


Classification

Category

Physical Impairment

Sport Classes

Para-archers are divided into three physical impairment sport classes:

W1 class: A tetraplegic archer in a wheelchair or a comparable disability.

W2 class: A paraplegic archer in a wheelchair or a comparable disability.

ST class: An archer who is standing or shooting from a stool or chair.

Additional Information

Additional Information