gtw-waterski-hero
Pan Am Waterski / Wakeboard

Water Ski - Wakeboard

Water Ski - Wakeboard


Photo Gallery


Sport Overview

Water Ski

One of the only motorized sport at the Games, water ski is a spectacle of turns, flips, twists and flight. Both men and women compete in water ski’s four events: tricks, slalom, jump and overall.

Competitors in tricks have 20 seconds to perform on and above the water with the winners receiving the highest judged score. Slalom skiers weave through a series of six buoys. With every successful pass, the length of the tow rope changes, making each pass more difficult. The skier with the most buoys passed wins. Jumpers launch themselves from a large ramp at speeds up to 120 kilometres per hour looking to land the longest — and winning — jump.

Canadians certainly left their mark on the water ski podium at the Guadalajara 2011 Pan Am Games. Boosted by Whitney McClintock’s four-medal performance, Canada led the pack with nine medals overall. Karen Stevens added three medals to the count and Jason McClintock chipped in another two. The U.S. also had a strong showing with seven medals, including six gold. Expect Team USA and Team Canada to battle it out again in 2015 in what will be some of the best waterskiing in the world at Ontario Place!

Wakeboard

One of the only motorized sport at the Games, wakeboard is a spectacle of turns, flips, twists and flight. Wakeboarding — a tricks-based, judged competition where riders on short boards get airborne by using the boat’s wake as a ramp.

Marcelo Girardi of Brazil found himself on the wakeboard podium at back-to-back Pan Am Games after a gold- medal finish at home in 2007 and a silver medal finish in Guadalajara in 2011.


History

Water Ski

The origins of waterskiing date back to 1922 when Ralph Samuelson, an 18-year-old from Minnesota, figured if you could ski on snow, you could ski on water. Samuelson and his brother experimented with various materials for the skis, eventually choosing wood, and a curtain sash as the ski rope. The first waterskiing competition was held in 1939.

The sport made its Pan American Games debut in 1995.

Wakeboard

Wakeboarding is derived from surfing, snowboarding, waterskiing and skateboarding and was created in the late 1980s.

The sport made its Pan American Games debut in 1995.


How it works

Water Ski

There are three events in waterskiing: tricks, slalom and jump.

In the jump event, skiers hit speeds of 120 kilometres per hour and execute a jump off a ramp located in the water. The furthest jump wins.

Slalom skiing is performed on one ski and competitors navigate through a series of six fixed buoys along a course measuring 259 metres (850 feet). Points are awarded for each buoy passed; the competitor with the most points wins.

In tricks competition, skiers perform 12 to 18 tricks both on the water and on the wake. Points are allocated to each of the tricks and awarded based on the successful completion of each trick. The most points wins.

Wakeboard

Wakeboarding is performed on a board resembling a snowboard, although shorter in length and slightly wider. While being towed through a boat’s wake, athletes perform a variety of tricks and are judged on execution, intensity and composition.


Terminology

Late
When a slalom skier falls behind in the slalom course, making it difficult to reach the next buoy.

Pass
A successful run by a waterskier through a slalom course.

Wake
The V-shaped water that trails behind a boat.

Additional Information

Additional Information